Why Should Cain Expect Republicans to Care That He’s Being “Lynched?”

Herman Cain’s backers played the L Card: an SuperPAC has released a web ad that describes the exposure of his misdeeds while head lobbyist at the National Restaurant Association as a lynching. That’s an odd decision, since there’s evidence that a lot of Republicans aren’t too bothered by lynching.

Oh, sure, if you ask Republicans if they support lynching you’d be hard-pressed to find anyone other than maybe some obscure county official in rural Missouri or Idaho or someplace like that to say publicly that lynching is OK. But when the Senate voted in 2005 on a resolution apologizing to the victims of lynchings and the descendants of those lynchings for the failure of the Senate to enact an anti-lynching law, almost one in five Republican senators refused to co-sponsor the resolution introduced by Louisiana Democrat Mary Landrieu. Those who did not sponsor the resolution–passed on a voice vote with no recorded roll call–included current Senators Lamar Alexander (TN), Thad Cochrane (MS), John Cornyn (TX), Mike Enzi (WY) and Richard Shelby (AL), as well as former senators Judd Gregg and John Sununu, both from the first-in-the-nation primary state of New Hampshire.

If any of these characters voices agreement with Cain’s supporters that he’s the victim of a high-tech lynching, I hope someone asks the follow-up question: “do you think lynchings are bad? And if so, why didn’t you support the official apology to the victims of lynchings and their descendants for the failure of the United States Senate to ban the practice of actual lynchings?”

Since he does not come across as a man with much self-awareness, I doubt it troubles Herman Cain that he’s running for the presidential nomination of a party that appears untroubled by the legacy of lynching.

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